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Sandor Leopold Landeau
Sandor Leopold Landeau (Hungarian-American, 1864-1924) noted painter, muralist, graphic, stained glass designer and teacher. He known for his works in oil of religious and genre scenes from regions in France, Italy, Palestine, Greece and the United States. He studied with Jean Paul Laurens (French, 1838-1921) and Benjamin Jean-Joseph Constant (French, 1845-1902), at the Académie Julian in Paris, France, and also with the well known Hungarian painter Mihály Munkácsy (Hungarian, 1844-1900) in Paris. While studying in Paris, he met fellow art student Alexis Jean Fournier (American, 1865-1948), whom he joined at the Roycroft Arts & Crafts community, East Aurora, NY in 1915. Landeau and his family lived for about twenty years in Paris, before being persuaded by Fournier to join the Roycroft community. Where he resided until his death in 1924.

Landeau exhibited in many Paris Salons with the Societé des Artistes Francais and in numerous U.S. exhibitions during his career. He was a member of the American Art Association of Paris and the Old American Art Club (from circa 1900), Montparnasse, Paris, France. His works can be found in museums, and in public and private collections worldwide.

During his career, Landeau won several prizes including the Second Wanamaker prize for the painting “Annunciation to the Shepherds”, at the American Art Association of Paris exhibition in 1900, and Honorable mention for the same painting at the Pan-American Exposition of 1901, in Buffalo, NY. The Gold medal prize was awarded for the painting “A Prayer for the Lost at Sea” at the Paris Salon of 1907.
“The Government of France, through Dujardin-Beaumetz, then Minister of Fine Arts, offered to purchase “Prayer for the Lost at Sea” for the State, affording the artist the privilege of the choice of any museum save the one he then hoped for as a depository of his masterpiece. Friends intervened with advice to the artist to defer the sale indefinitely, which alone accounts for the presence of this exceptional work in America.” [1] Later in Landeau’s life, "Prayer for the Lost at Sea" was exchanged for back rent while he was living at the Roycroft Arts & Crafts community in East Aurora, NY.

From a New York Times newspaper article dated August 15, 1900, Landeau’s family had been residing in Cincinnati, OH circa the late 1870’s, where his father was a small business merchant who made a comfortable living for his family. Sandor showed an early interest in art and at the age of sixteen, with the willingness of his parents he was sent to Bloomington, WI, where he took drawing and painting lessons. He wrote home regularly for six months, but then suddenly his letters ceased and all trace of him was lost. The parents made every attempt to locate and trace their son but without success and feared that their son may be dead. Sandor had later moved to La Crosse, WI. In the meantime Sandor’s father had died and his mother moved to New York City. The mystery of her son’s disappearance carried on for twenty years until the family discovered an emerging painter living and exhibiting in Paris who went by the name of Landeau. They heard reports that he studied in Paris with the well known Hungarian painter Mihály Munkácsy (1844-1900) and that he had also painted for some well known Americans. With this new information, his family began investigating and discovered that he was to exhibit in the upcoming Pan American Exposition of 1901, in Buffalo, NY. This prompted them to send a letter to the then U.S. Commissioner-General for the 1900 Paris Exposition, Mr. Ferdinand W. Peck of Chicago, IL, however the letter brought no satisfaction to the family, since Peck was not going to be the commissioner for the 1901 Pan Am Exposition. Landeau did not exhibit at the Paris Exposition but did exhibit in the Paris Salon and also exhibited at the American Art Association of Paris in 1900, with which Peck had no associations and probably couldn’t or wouldn’t help in the Landeau family’s personal matter concerning their missing artist.

The name, “S.L. Landeau appeared in the La Crosse, WI city directories from 1888-1893. The records indicate that he rented out Room 304 in the McMillan building at 401 Main Street in downtown La Crosse for his art business and studio. La Crosse was a lumber town enjoying an economic boom at the time of Landeau’s arrival. He was likely able to eke out a living as a free-lance painter, enjoying the support of local gentry, possibly supplementing his income by giving lessons. An article in the La Crosse Republican & Leader dated October 27, 1890, tells of a Landeau painting entitled “A Halt in the Mesa.” It was purchased by some leading citizens of La Crosse and donated to the La Crosse Public Library. Today, Landeau’s work still hangs in the town library. It can be seen in the magazine reading area on the main floor.

The economic downturn following the panic of 1893 may have entered in the decision to go to Paris to study. Though money was tight, continued support from friends and patrons made it possible. A generous benefactor by the name of Mrs. Louise Wood Withee is credited with the idea and the support to make it possible. Landeau was in Paris in the fall of 1893 and was a student of Laurens and Constant at the Académie Julian. Landeau sent what money he could back to La Crosse to pay debts and make good on he loans that helped to finance his trip and studies. At one time, probably short on funds, he sent a number of his Paris paintings to La Crosse to be sold. In a letter dated March 2, 1894, Landeau wrote, “I regret to learn of the art sale fiasco. I am especially sorry that the efforts you, George Schweizer and Mr. Magill have made received such feeble returns. I thank you most heartily, Mr. McConnell, for having seen my creditors. It makes me happy to learn that they are not uneasy, and that they have confidence in me…I will bide my time until the `95 Salon and make a hard effort at an entry with something from Hungary, if I can get there this spring…I am forced to acknowledge my tardiness, but the truth is I have the influenza quite badly.”

The economic downturn may have been one reason sales did not go well. Another may have been that Landeau’s staunchest and most generous supporters already had purchased or received as gifts a number of his paintings. They ultimately ended up with more from Paris. Landeau’s fortunes improved with his painting “Remords de Judas” (“The Remorse of Judas”) which gained him entry into the Salon in 1896, Paris’ most prestigious art exhibition.”
[2]

For six months during the years 1898-99, Sandor went on an artistic pilgrimage to the Holy Land accompanying fellow artist and friend Henry Ossawa Tanner (African-American, 1859-1937). Tanner originally had been sent to Jerusalem with the encouragement and funds from Lewis Rodman Wanamaker (American, 1863-1928). Wanamaker was an avid supporter of the arts and son of the Philadelphia department-store founder John Wanamaker (American, 1838-1922, known for the Wanamaker Prize given at Paris Salons), and was the head of the store’s Paris office. Wanamaker thought that the approaching visit of the Emperor of Germany in 1898 would give him an opportunity for some “profitable” subjects, but during the visit of the Emperor, they found the town so sealed off that they never got to see him so the “profitable” project had to be abandoned. The time was not lost however, and the two painted in Jerusalem and around the Dead Sea for six months in Palestine, Israel.

While in Palestine, Sandor met Dr. A.B. Whitney and his daughter Marie Louise of New York City. Mutual interests and affections soon blossomed into a relationship amid the romantic settings of Palestine. After her return to New York City, they corresponded and in December of 1899, Sandor came to New York where the couple married on December 11th, in the First Reformed Church on East Fifty-fifth Street in the city. Soon afterward, the newlyweds left the city to live in Paris to live at Sandor’s 51 boulevard Saint-Jacques address.

In the above mentioned New York Times news article, the family gave Landeau’s first name as Samuel (not Sandor, as he is most well known for). There is very little information to go on, but Sandor may have possibly changed his first name shortly before that time, maybe on a trip to Hungary which he planned to do in the spring of 1894 or possibly during his later painting trip to Palestine. There are also two of his paintings in the Smithsonian Archives of American Art that seem to back up the theory with the misspelled first and last name listed as; Landau, Samuel Leopold, painter, an oil painting titled “Misty Morning on the Mississippi”, painted in 1891, and a full length portrait oil painting of “Dr. Edward Evans”, painted in 1896. La Crosse, WI sits alongside the Mississippi River and the above mentioned painting shows that Landeau was still in La Crosse at that time period. Dr. Edward Evans practiced medicine in La Crosse, WI from 1888 and was recognized as one of the leading physicians of the city. He more than likely met Sandor while he was in La Crosse, but didn’t have his portrait done until years later since Sandor had traveled to Paris around 1893. Dr. Evans spent six months in the study of surgery in Europe in 1896, dividing his time between Paris, London, Vienna and Berlin, and probably commissioned Sandor to paint his portrait while he was in Paris.

According to the above mentioned New York Times news article, one of Sandor’s sister’s, Mrs. Frances Schlesinger was quoted as saying about Sandor, “Because he is ashamed of us, he told her father (Dr. Whitney) that all the members of his family were dead.”[3] No specific reason was given in the article that would explain Sandor’s actions. So the possibility exists that he could have changed his name so that his family couldn’t find him, or maybe to escape from creditors when he was living in La Crosse or maybe he plain just didn’t like the name Samuel. Whatever the reason may have been, he has since been primarily known as Sandor Leopold Landeau. In early August, 1900 Mrs. Landeau with the help of her daughter Stella, thought it was time that the story was made public. In mid August, Mrs. Landeau received a letter at her home at 114 East One Hundred & Second Street, directing her to call upon Dr. A.B. Whitney. The letter which was unsigned, read as follows: “S. Leopold Landeau sailed for Paris on the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse on Jan. 1. He took with him a bride, who was a member of the family of Dr. A.B. Whitney of 157 West Fifteenth Street. At the above address you will doubtless receive more recent particulars. For several years he has lived and studied in Paris.”[4] Mrs. Landeau and Stella went to the address given and there they saw a photograph which they recognized as that of their missing artist. “Dr. Whitney is deeply affected.” said Stella, “and we will have no more to say now. The story has been told. We now hope to hear from our brother”[5] Dr. Whitney’s son confirmed the facts of the marriage of his sister to Sandor and of the interview between Mrs. Landeau and his father, which led to the identification. “We have cabled to my sister,” he said, “There is nothing more to add.”[6] Unfortunately here is where the story ends. No other information has surfaced regarding whether or not his family actually ever found or saw Sandor again.

“Landeau’s versatility is not the defect it might be in an artist of superficial training and power. He produces vivacity and a fervor in his work that justify his temperamental excursions.”[7]

Artist Statement:

“To love one’s art above the material things that so compellingly and urgently surround us and not to swerve from the higher purpose; to strive for the ideal which, even in modest measure, may be helpful and illuminating-these are the canons of a noble art.”[8] –Sandor Landeau

“It would be better for art,” he said to an interviewer not long before his death, “if quantity were curbed. There is jazz painting, just as there is jazz music and writing and cooking and conversation. Enduring art must have profound self-expression. Impatience, hurry, carelessness are enemies of good pictures.”[9] –Sandor Landeau

Chronology:

1864- Born, April 14, Abony, Hungary, and his family later immigrated to the United States circa the late 1870's and resided in Cincinnati, OH, where his father was a small business merchant who made a comfortable living for his family. Presumably Landeau's original first name was Samuel, possibly later changed to Sandor, a traditional Hungarian name). One report showed he died at the age of 64 in 1924, which would put his birthdate at circa 1860, which is incorrect. On his passport application in 1907 for travel to Norway, Sweden (from the American Embassy in Paris, France), he wrote his birthdate as April 14, 1864, and birthplace as Abony, Hungary. A few reports list his birthplace as New York City, but they are incorrect as well. Sandor was one of five children born to the family of three boys and two girls, Stella and Frances (brothers names are unknown).

Circa 1880- Showing early promise as an artist, Sandor with the willingness of his parents, was sent to Bloomington, WI, at the age of sixteen to take drawing and painting lessons and he later moved to La Crosse, WI.

1884- October 18, Sandor became a naturalized citizen of the United States, in the County Court of McLean County, Bloomington, WI.

Circa early 1890's- Traveled on an expedition to Old Mexico.

Circa 1893- Traveled to Paris to enroll in the Académie Julian, and studied with Jean Paul Laurens (French, 1838-1921) and Benjamin Jean-Joseph Constant (French, 1845-1902), of the Académie and also with the well known Hungarian painter Mihály Munkácsy (Hungarian, 1844-1900).

1893- In the fall, met fellow art student Alexis Jean Fournier (American, 1865-1948) who became one of his close friends and who later persuaded Sandor to join Elbert Hubbard’s (American, 1856-1915) Roycroft community of Arts & Crafts artisans in East Aurora, NY in 1915.

Circa 1893-1916- Traveled extensively throughout Europe, France, Egypt, Syria, Holy Land, Morocco, Canary Islands, Scandinavia, Russia, Spitsbergen, Norway, Sweden and the Bear Islands.

1896- Exhibited, group show, Paris Salon, Exposition Des Beaux-Arts, Societé des Artistes Francais, for painting “Remords de Judas” (“The Remorse of Judas”), Societé des Artistes Francais, Paris, France. Resided at 51 boulevard Saint-Jacques, Paris, France.

1897- Exhibited, group show, Paris Salon, Societé des Artistes Francais, for his ink wash painting “Le Christ exorcisant un possédé” (“Christ delivering one possessed” or otherwise known as “Christ casting out the Evil Spirit”), Paris France. Sandor still resided at 51 boulevard Saint-Jacques, Paris, France.

1898-1899- Sandor accompanied fellow artist and friend Henry Ossawa Tanner (African-American, 1859-1937) on an artistic pilgrimage to Jerusalem, with Tanner originally being sent there with the encouragement and funds from Lewis Rodman Wanamaker (American, 1863-1928). Wanamaker was an avid supporter of the arts and son of the Philadelphia department-store founder John Wanamaker (American, 1838-1922, known for the Wanamaker Prize given at Paris Salons), and was the head of the store’s Paris office. Wanamaker thought that the approaching visit of the Emperor of Germany would give Tanner an opportunity for some “profitable” subjects, but during the visit of the Emperor, they found the town so sealed off that they never got to see him so the “profitable” project had to be abandoned, but the time was not lost and the two of them painted in Jerusalem and around the Dead Sea for six months, Palestine, Israel. Sandor was on the board of Directors for a magazine publication put out by the American Art Association in Paris (of which he was a member) called The Quartier Latin, Paris, London and New York, when a gentleman by the name of T.A. Breuer had been promoted to the office of the Librarian for the magazine, creating a vacancy on the board of which Landeau stepped in.

1899- Exhibited, group show, Paris Salon, Societé des Artistes Francais, for the painting “The Village Story Teller” (painted in Holland), Paris, France. Married, December 11th, to Marie Louise (née Whitney), daughter of Dr. A.B. Whitney of 157 West Seventy-fifth Street, ceremony took place at the First Reformed Church on East Fifty-fifth Street in NYC, and then left shortly thereafter to live in Paris, France.

1900- Jan 1, Sandor and his new bride sailed out of New York City on the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse and the couple continued to reside at his 51 boulevard Saint-Jacques address, Paris, France. Exhibited, group show, Paris Salon, Societé des Artistes Francais, for the painting “Samson” (otherwise known as “Samson and Delilah”, reports show that he won second prize for the painting), Paris, France. Exhibited, group show, American Art Association of Paris, won the Second Wanamaker prize for the painting “Annunciation to the Shepherds”, Paris, France. Sandor’s address still showed as 51 boulevard Saint-Jacques, Paris, France.

1901- Exhibited, group show, Pan-American Exposition of 1901, American Art Association of Paris, France, for the painting “Annunciation to the Shepherds” (received honorable mention, and the painting had also previously won the Second Wanamaker prize for the Exhibit of the American Art Association of Paris, 1900), Gallery D (Vestibule), Buffalo, NY. Exhibited, Paris Salon, Societé des Artistes Francais, for two paintings “Portrait de Mme. L.” and “La robe de l’aïeule” (“The dress of the ancestress/grandmother”), Paris, France. Sandor and his wife moved with his address showing as 97 rue Jouffroy, Paris, France.

1904- Exhibited, group show, Paris Salon, Societé des Artistes Francais, for the painting “Annonciation aux bergers” (“Annunciation to the Shepherds”), Paris, France. Exhibited at the National Academy of Design, New York City. Sandor had a New York City address (as given to the NAD with his entry, 1904) and also resided at 54 rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs, Paris, France, and then later resided at 31 boulevard Berthier, Paris, France. June 9, he sailed from the U.S. bound for France, on board the ship the "La Lorraine" arriving in Le Havre, France on June 16.

1904-1908- Maintained a dual residency in New York City and in Paris, France.

1905- Exhibited, group show, Paris Salon, Societé des Artistes Francais, for his portrait painting of a woman titled “La dame à l’écharpe” (“The lady in the sash”), received honorable mention, Paris, France. Sandor continued to reside at 31 boulevard Berthier, Paris, France.

1906- Exhibited, group show, Paris Salon, Societé des Artistes Francais, for the painting “Lecture intime”, Paris France. Sandor still resided at 31 boulevard Berthier, Paris France. Exhibited, October 16 to November 29, group exhibition, “Nineteenth Annual Exhibition of Oil Paintings and Sculpture by American Artists”, The Art Institute of Chicago, for the painting “Lecture intime” (from the Paris Salon, S.A.F., 1906), Second Floor, Rooms 25-30, Exhibition included 351 original oil paintings and 11 original sculptures, Chicago, IL.

1907- Exhibited, group show, Paris Salon, Societé des Artistes Francais, Gold medal prize for painting “Pour les marins perdus” (or otherwise known as “For the lost sailors” or “For the sailors lost at Sea” or better known as “A Prayer for the Lost at Sea”, which was painted on the coast of France near Boulogne-sur-Mer, a small fishing village which was the early home of the French painter Jean-Charles Cazin, [French, 1840-1901]), and was inspired by the life of fisher-folk on the coast of France, and established him among the great religious artists of the time, oil on canvas, Paris, France. Sandor continued to live at 31 boulevard Berthier, Paris, France. Circa June 17, he and his wife traveled from Paris, France, to Norway, Sweden.

1908- Exhibited, group show, Paris Salon, Societé des Artistes Francais, for painting “La parure” (“The finery”), Paris, France, which featured a beautiful woman in a red evening gown seated at her French dressing table and mirror, putting on her earrings and her maid standing in front of her holding out a double matching necklace for her to put on (a parure is an entire wardrobe, or suite, of matching jewelry reserved for royalty and the wealthier classes and no woman was considered socially acceptable without a complete wardrobe of jewelry that defined her status, strength and political power). Exhibited, group show, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, for the painting “A Prayer for the Lost at Sea” (otherwise known as “Pour les marins perdus”, “For the lost sailors” or “For the sailors lost at Sea”, Gold medal winner at the Paris Salon of 1907), Philadelphia, PA. Sandor’s address still showed as 31 boulevard Berthier, Paris, France.

1909- (circa June) Their daughter was born, Marie Louise Whitney (named after her mother), Paris, France. June, 26th their daughter received her christening, with their home lavishly decorated with flowers and guests included the Rev. Dr. Morgan, the Princess de Sagan, Mme. Joubert, Dr. And Mrs. Gross, Mr. & Mrs. Paul Verola, and M. and Mme. Carvé, Paris, France.

1912- Autumn, Mrs. Landeau took their daughter to Rome, to join the Montessori School so that she might have Mme. Maria Montessori’s (Italian, 1870-1952) personal teaching and method of education, and the family stayed the winter in their apartment in the aristocratic quarter circa November/December, formerly occupied by the American Soprano Miss Gail Gardner who was about to make her debut there under the stage name of “Giovanna Garda” in the role of Mimi in “La Boheme” at the Adriano Theatre, Rome, Italy.

1913- March, 29, while Queen Margherita of Savoy (Italian, 1851-1926, Queen consort from 1878-1900), wife of King Umberto I of Italy (Italian, 1844-1900. Reign, 1878-1900), was visiting the Montessori School in Rome, she was most impressed when she met the young Landeau child, “…who had been chosen to receive the Queen with her preceptress. When she took the Queen’s hand and made curtsey she turned it gently over and kissed the palm. The Queen noticing the pretty action, kissed her. Afterward at home the tot explained, “As I kiss the back of the hand of ordinary people, I thought I should kiss the palm of the Queen’s.”[10] When this was related to the Queen Margherita she was highly delighted and said that she had never heard anything so delicious in her life”[11]. Mrs. Landeau and their daughter soon left Rome and the family was still shown as residing in Paris, France.

Circa 1915- Moved to the United States to join Elbert Hubbard’s (American, 1856-1915) Roycroft community of Arts & Crafts artisans, at the request of Elbert Hubbard and probably by his close friend Alexis Jean Fournier (American, 1865-1948), East Aurora, NY.

1915-1924- Continued to travel and exhibit around the United States, gradually losing interest in exhibiting later in his life. Settled in East Aurora until his death in 1924.

1916- February, exhibited, two man show with Joseph Pennell, Toledo Museum of Art, paintings by Landeau, Toledo, OH. Exhibited, March 10-April 1, solo show of fifty of his European paintings, Broderick Gallery (Mr. James Broderick), with art lecture given by Landeau Friday March, 17, at 8:00pm at the gallery, 700 Main Street, 8:00pm, Buffalo, NY. Exhibited, April-May, solo show, 28 Landeau paintings featured in the show of a series of pictures from Italy and Greece together with two important Salon canvasses called “La parure, (Woman in Red Gown, otherwise known as “The finery” from the 1908 Paris Salon) and “Prayer for the Lost at Sea” (otherwise known as “Pour les marins perdus”, “For the lost sailors” or “For the sailors lost at Sea”, Paris, Salon gold medal winner 1907), Gallery II, curator of the exhibit was George L. Herdle of the Memorial Art Gallery of Rochester, NY, Held in tandem with the exhibition “Exhibition of Paintings by Men Who Paint the Far West: Twelve American Artists and Sandor Landeau”, Detroit Museum of Art, Detroit, MI. June 15-September 15, in the summer, Landeau and Fournier taught an outdoor class in figure and landscape painting with their aim and purpose stated to be, "Not my Manner, nor his, do we strive to Teach, but the Spirit that's Your Own, is our aim to Reach.", at a cost of $75 for the 3 months or $30 per month, Roycroft campus, East Aurora, NY. Exhibited, solo show of mostly European pieces and included a single portrait of Elbert Hubbard’s two grandchildren, Vose Galleries, Boston, MA.

1917- Exhibited, solo show, at the Vose galleries, Boston, MA.

1917-18- Exhibited, solo show of paintings, Roycroft Chapel, on the Roycroft campus, the catalogue stated that the “majority of the paintings comprising this collection were recently exhibited in Boston.”[12], and the paintings were being “offered for sale at about half of the original prices,”[13] owing “to the war conditions.”[14], East Aurora, NY. November 8th-January 2nd, Exhibited, group show, “Thirtieth Annual Exhibition of American Oil Paintings and Sculpture”, for his painting “The Three Wise Men” (from the Toledo Art Museum collection, Toledo, OH), Room 251 and New Wing, second floor, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Circa 1917-1922- Ongoing exhibition of 50 Landeau works, Roycroft Chapel, on the Roycroft campus, East Aurora, NY.

1919- Exhibited, solo show of paintings, The Babcock Gallery, 19 East 49th Street, NYC.

1921- Exhibited, solo show of oil paintings, South Shore Country Club, Hingham, MA.

Up until 1922- Reports show that Landeau continued to keep his studio in La Crosse, WI, leaving it permanently in 1922 when he had previously settled in East Aurora, NY.

1923- August 16, in a letter to Mr. Radgers, Landeau offered to sell two of his paintings, “Flight of Boabdil” at two-thirds of the original cost and the “Tower of Boabdil” at half price, in his letter to the gentleman Landeau said, “It is only the imperative needs of funds that would impel [sic] me to part with them at such low figures.”[15], East Aurora, NY.

1924- February 20, Landeau asked Elbert Hubbard to purchase his painting “Toilers in the Fields”, one of his works accepted for the Paris Salon (unknown date), for $3,000.00 in order to cancel his debt and, with the balance, allow him to got to California for “a change of scenery and climate.”[16], East Aurora, NY. Exhibited, group show, “The Second Annual Exhibition of the Buffalo Salon of Independent Artists”, two paintings exhibited including the “A Prayer For The Lost At Sea” (otherwise known as “Pour les marins perdus”, “For the lost sailors” or “For the sailors lost at Sea”, Paris, Salon gold medal winner 1907), Buffalo, NY. Died, in “comparative poverty and isolation”[17], and was received with profound sadness by Fournier, who was in Indiana at the time, and upon his return to East Aurora, placed a simple, unmarked stone at the grave of his old friend, Buffalo, NY.

1929- Circa June, The Landeau daughter Marie Louise Whitney Landeau graduated, St. Margaret’s School and Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY.

Circa 1932- Early Spring, the Landeau daughter was to be married to George Grenville Benedict, son of Professor and Mrs. George Wyllys Benedict of Providence, RI. In a news article from the New York Times dated November 15th, 1931, they list the daughter as from the late Mrs. Edward E. Palen of Paris, France and New York City and Sandor L. Landeau, which leaves the possibility that Sandor and his wife had divorced (possibly before he moved to join the Roycroft community) or that she had remarried after his death in 1924. I didn’t find any information regarding his family moving with him to the Roycroft community or any other information mentioning his family which leads me to believe they may have divorced prior to 1915.

1987- Exhibited, March 28-May 24, group retro exhibition, “The Wayward Muse: A Historical Survey of Painting in Buffalo”, organized at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery by Susan Krane (Curator), for the painting “Landscape with Horse and Cart, n.d.”, oil on canvas, 35” x 39.5” (Collection of Jeffrey Thier, Buffalo, NY), Buffalo, NY.

Exhibited also at: Cleveland, OH, (unknown date) for the painting “A Prayer for the Lost at Sea” (otherwise known as “Pour les marins perdus”, “For the lost sailors” or “For the sailors lost at Sea”, Gold medal winner at the Paris Salon of 1907); Liège, Belgium; and Munich, Germany.

Memberships: American Art Association of Paris, France; and the Old American Art Club (from circa 1900), Montparnasse, Paris, France.

Prizes & Honors: Second Wanamaker prize for the painting “Annunciation to the Shepherds”, American Art Association of Paris (1900), France; Honorable mention for the painting “Annunciation to the Shepherds”, Pan-American Exposition of 1901, American Art Association of Paris, France, in Buffalo, NY; Honorable mention for his portrait painting “La dame à l’écharpe” (“The lady in the sash”), Paris Salon, Societé des Artistes Francais, Paris, France (1905); and Gold medal prize for painting “A Prayer for the Lost at Sea”, (otherwise known as “Pour les marins perdus”, “For the lost sailors” or “For the sailors lost at Sea”), Paris Salon, Paris, France (1907).

Museums Collections: Smithsonian Archives of American Art (#1-7), 1.) “Misty Morning on the Mississippi”, oil painting, 1891, 15.5” x 23.5”, (misspelled name given as Landau, Samuel Leopold, painter), 2.) “Dr. Edward Evans”, full length portrait oil painting, 1896, 17” x 13.5”, (misspelled name given as Landau, Samuel Leopold, painter), 3.) “About the Macbeth Gallery records: A Finding Aid to the Macbeth Gallery Records, 1838-1968, bulk 1892-1953, in the Archives of American Art, by Stephanie Ashley, Erin Corley and Jetta Samulski”, 4.) A portrait oil painting of Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Putnam (Louise Duncan), 27” x 22”, (misspelled name given as Landeau, Sander L., b. 1864, painter), reference: National Society of the Colonial Dames of America. Iowa, "Portraits in Iowa: Portraits of Americans, made before 1900 and now located in Iowa,", 5.) A photograph, “Tent of Henry Tanner and Landau (misspelled) in Palestine, c. 1899”, Photographic Print, b&w, 11 x 12cm, unidentified photographer, Description: Identification on verso (handwritten), “Tent of Tanner and Landaue (misspelled) near the Mount of Temptation Palestine about 1899 (?) Neat Fountia Elisha, Note our donkey.”, Forms part of: Henry Ossawa Tanner papers, 1860s-1978 (bulk 1890-1937), 6.) A correspondence between the gallery and the artist, in Section 1.1: Correspondence, 1838-1968, n.d., Box 52: Landeau, Sandor L. (NMc9), circa. 1902, 7.) A b&w photograph circa 1900, 13 x 17cm, of the, “Old American Art Club, ca. 1900”, from the Henry Ossawa Tanner papers, 1860s-1978 (bulk 1890-1937), unidentified photographer, individuals on the front are numbered and their identifications appear on the verso, handwritten: "Old American Art Club, Montparnasse Paris circa 1900. 1. Barlow, 2. Winter, 3. Wood, 4. Landeau, 5. Tanner, 6. Cucel.", published in the: Archives of American Art Journal, Volume 32, no. 2, p. 9, 1992; Sandor Landeau letter to Mr. Radgers, dated August 16, 1923, regarding the sale of two paintings, “Flight of Boabdil” at two-thirds of the original cost and the “Tower of Boabdil” at half price, and a letter by Sandor Landeau to Elbert Hubbard, dated February 20, 1924, regarding the sale of the painting, “Toilers in the Fields”, (in the Landeau File), in the archives of the Roycroft Arts Museum, East Aurora, NY; Burchfield-Penney Art Center, Buffalo, NY; and Toledo Museum of Art, painting titled “The Three Wise Men”, Toledo, OH.

Galleries: “Finding Aid for the Gordon B. Washburn Records, 1932-1941”, AK2.5, Gallery Archives, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, G. Robert Strauss Jr. Memorial Library, Container List Series I. Works Progress Administration Federal Arts Projects Records, 1932-1942, 1939: 37.11 "R," 1939, correspondence includes Persis Weaver Roberston (lithographer) and a letter from Elbert Hubbard, II to S.H. Knox regarding painter Sandor Landeau, Buffalo, NY; Unidentified manuscript, Landeau file, Memorial Art Gallery, Rochester, NY.

Public Collections: “A Prayer for the Lost at Sea” (otherwise known as “Pour les marins perdus”, “For the lost sailors” or “For the sailors lost at Sea”, Gold medal winner at the Paris Salon of 1907), oil on canvas, owned by the Aurora Historical Society, and hangs in the Aurora Town Hall, East Aurora, NY; “Ali Baba” (AKA: Anson Alonzo Blackman), oil on canvas, 30 x 25, Roycorft Arts Museum, Boyce Lydell, East Aurora, NY; “Christ Healing the Maniac” (previously public, now in private collection), painting, 5.2’ x 7’, donated in 1898 by wealthy Pittsburg industrialist William W. Card, who reportedly came across the Landeau painting while traveling through Europe and had paid $15,000 for it, Fairfield County District Library, hung in the City Hall library location for 82 years in the Reading Area until 1980 when the library relocated from City Hall to its current site, 219 N. Broad St., Lancaster, with no room to hang it, the painting was sold at a library auction in 2002 for $2,300 to an unknown buyer; A Checklist of the Hamlin Garland Papers in the University of Southern California Library, online database, B Photographs section, #722, Miscellaneous photographs and artwork, L., Miscellaneous photographs and drawings, including photographs of art work inscribed to Garland by Sandor L. Landeau and Alexander Phimister Proctor, 7 items; and “A Halt in the Mesa”, purchased by some leading citizens of la Crosse, WI, and donated to the La Crosse Public Library where it still hangs and can be seen in the magazine reading area on the main floor, La Crosse, WI.

Private Collections: “Landscape with Horse and Cart, n.d.”, oil on canvas, 35” x 39.5”, Collection of Jeffrey Thier, Buffalo, NY; and “Christ Healing the Maniac”, purchased at a library auction in la Crosse, WI in 2002 for $2,300 to an unknown buyer; “Nancy Hubbard with Doll”, 1916, oil on canvas, 24 x 20”; (Photo), Nancy Hubbard breaking pose for Sandor Landeau, as Alta Fattey Hubbard and Emma Fournier look on, 1916, Turgeon-Rust collection.

Publications: La Crosse Republican & Leader, “The Picture Secured: A ‘Halt in the Mesa’ Will Be Placed in the Library”, October 27, 1890, p. 4.; La Crosse Republican & Leader, [Announcement] “Hours of Leisure”, January 5, 1892, p. 4.; La Crosse Chronicle, [Announcement] “Mr. Landeau's Pictures”, December 13, 1896, p. 3.; The New York Times, online news article, “Champs Élysées Salon; American Contributions More Numerous and as Praise Worthy.”, Correspondence of the United Press, Wednesday, April 29th, (1896); Cataloque illustré de PeintureEt SculptureSalon de 1896, Societé des Artistes Francais, by Library D’Art Ludovic bashet, editeur, Paris, pg. 32, number 1135 Landeau, (S.-L.), (address) 51 boulevard Saint-Jacques, for the painting “Remords de Judas”; New York Tribune online news article, “Art And Drama In Paris: “Sending-in Day” At The Salon An Anxious Period”, Sunday Edition, March 28, 1897, Part III Of Eight Pages; Cataloque illustré de PeintureEt SculptureSalon de 1897, Societé des Artistes Francais, by Library D’Art Ludovic bashet, editeur, Paris, pg. 32, No. 952 Landeau (S.-L.), (address) 51 boulevard Saint-Jacques, for the ink wash painting “Le Christ exorcisant un possédé.- Christ delivering one possessed”, and pg. 14 illustration of the painting;

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The Quartier Latin, by The American Art Association, Vol. V, June & July, 1898, No. 23, Published London, Paris and New York, J.M. Dent & Co.; Waterloo Daily Reporter, “La Crosse Artist Winning Fame.”, pg. 4, June, 30, 1899; New York Times online news article, “Artist Son Found At Last; Mrs’s Landeau’s Search of Twenty Years Rewarded. Young Man Lives In Paris. Was Married a Few Months Ago to Miss Whitney of This City-The Sister’s Story.”, August 15, 1900, Wednesday, page 12; Grand Rapids Tribune, “Tried to Forget Them: Samuel Landeau, Formerly of La Crosse, was Ashamed of His Family, New York, N.Y.. Aug. 15. (Special.)”, Drumb and Sutor –Publishers, August, 18, (1900); Cataloque illustré Salon de 1900, Societé des Artistes Francais, Ludovic Bashet, editeur, Paris, pg. 33, 744 Landeau (S.-L.), (address) 51 boulevard Saint-Jacques, for the painting “Samson”; The online catalogue, Cataloque illustré du Salon de 1901, Societé des Artistes Francais, by Library D’Art Ludovic Bashet, Éditeur, Paris, pg. 33, 1166 & 1167 Landeau (S.-L.), (address) 97 rue Jouffroy, Paris, France, for the paintings “Portrait de Mme. L.” and “La robe de l’aïeule”;

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Pan-American Exposition: Catalogue of the Exhibition of Fine Arts, Buffalo, by William A Coffin, Director of Fine Arts, David Gray Publisher, Buffalo, NY, pg. 19, (1901); American Art Annual, by Florence N. Levy (editor), Vol. IV, [New York: American Art Annual, 1903], pg. 44; Cataloque illustré du Salon de 1904, Societé des Artistes Francais, by Publié Sous La Direction Ludovic Bashet, Library d’Art, Paris, pg. 30, 1028 Landeau (S.-L.), (address) 54 rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs, Paris, France, for the painting “Annonciation aux bergers”; American Art Annual, by Florence N. Levy (editor), Vol. V, [New York: American Art Annual, 1904-1906], pg. 382; Cataloque illustré du Salon de 1905, Societé des Artistes Francais, by Publié Sous La Direction Ludovic Bashet, Bibliothéque Des Annales, Paris, pg. 35, 1083 Landeau (S.-L.), (address) 31 boulevard Berthier, Paris, France, for the painting “La dame à l’écharpe”; New-York Daily Tribune, online digitized news article/page, “The French Salon of 1905: Resembles a Huge Industrial Picture Fair”, Thursday, May 11, 1905, Page 7, Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC;

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Cataloque illustré du Salon de 1906, Societé des Artistes Francais, by Publié Sous La Direction Ludovic Bashet, Bibliothéque Des Annales, Paris, pg. 31, 927 Landeau (S.-L.), (no address given), for the painting “Lecture intime”; Catalogue of the Nineteenth Annual Exhibition of Oil Paintings and Sculpture by American Artists, October 16 to November 29, 1906, The Art Institute of Chicago; Naturalized Passport Application Record for travel to Norway, Sweden from the American Embassy in Paris, France, Form No. 177, No. 102, June 17, 1907; Cataloque illustré du Salon de 1907, Societé des Artistes Francais, by Publié Sous La Direction Ludovic Bashet, Bibliothéque Des Annales, Paris, pg. 31, 918 Landeau (S.-L.), (address) 31 boulevard Berthier, Paris, France, for the painting “Pour les marins perdus”, illustration of the painting on pg. 174; American Art Annual, by Florence N. Levy (editor), Vol. VI, [New York: American Art Annual, 1907-1908], pg. 375; New York Daily Tribune, online newspaper article, “A Paris Art Fair”, con’t from third page, Sunday, May 12, 1907, Image 24; Cataloque illustré du Salon de 1908, Societé des Artistes Francais, by Publié Sous La Direction Ludovic Bashet, Bibliothéque Des Annales, Paris, pg. 33, 999 Landeau (S.-L.), (address) 31 boulevard Berthier, Paris, France, for the painting “La parure”;

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The New York Times, The Times’s Special Cable Dispatches, “American Hostesses of Week in Paris”, pg. 2, section C, Sunday, June 27, 1909; New York Times, online news article, “The Landeaus in Rome”, Special Cable to THE NEW YORK TIMES, November 24, 1912, Sunday Section: SPECIAL FOREIGN DISPATCHES SPORTS, Page C4; The New York Times, online news article and quote [10] & [11], “Child Kissed Queen’s Palm. Little American Girl in Rome Delighted the Heart of Margherita. By Marconi Transatlantic Wireless Telegraph to the New York Times”, March 30, 1913; The Buffalo Express (Morning Edition) online digitized news article, “Sandor Landeau to Speak”, Thursday Morning, March 16, 1916, Page 6; Catalogue of the Twenty-ninth Annual Exhibition of American Oil Paintings and Sculpture, by the Art Institute of Chicago, November 2 to December 7, 1916; La Crosse Tribune, “Trio of Artists from La Crosse Now World Famed: Landau, Peyraud and Polasek Acknoweldged Leaders in Painting and Sculpture”, February 5, 1916, p. 7.; Fra, “Fournier-Landeau Outdoor Summer School of Art”, No. 17, XIII, June, 1916;

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Bulletin of the Detroit Museum of Art, Vol. X, April 1916, No. 8, Exhibitions, Sandor Landeau, pg. 7; Detroit Museum of Art, Annual Report for the Year 1916, Special Exhibitions 1915-16, Schedule of Exhibitions, April, Sandor Landeau, pg. 33; The Buffalo Express (Morning Edition) online digitized news article, art exhibition ad “Mr. James Broderick has arranged for an exhibition of paintings by Sandor Landeau, the American Artist at the Broderick Gallery”, Friday Morning, March (illegible date), 1916, (unknown page number); Boston Evening Transcript, “Mr. Landeau’s Pictures”, by William Howe Downes, circa 1916; American Art Annual, by Florence Nightingale Levy (editor), The American Federation of Arts, Vol. XIII, Washington, DC, (1917); Catalogue of Thirtieth Annual Exhibition of American Oil Paintings and Sculpture: at the Art Institute of Chicago From November 8-1917-to January 2-1918, Paintings section, Room 251 and New Wing, second floor, pg. 48; Exhibition of Paintings by Sandor L. Landeau at the Roycroft Chapel, East Aurora, by The Roycrofters, East Aurora, NY, circa 1917-18;

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The Brooklyn Daily Eagle online digitized news article, “Art Calendar”, New York, Sunday, April 13, 1919, Page 10; Exhibition of Oil Paintings by Sandor Landeau, Hingham, MA, Southshore Country Club, 1921; Current Opinion magazine (formerly Current Literature), June issue, “Sandor Landeau: A Painter Of The Spiritual Life”, by Henry Wellington Wack, pg. 805-808, The Current Literature Publishing Co., Current Opinion Building, NYC, (1922); “S.L. Landeau the artist, has decided to leave La Crosse to locate in some more prominent art center. During his residence here Mr. Landeau has won much fame as an artist and his studio in the McMillan building has always been a rendezvous of art lovers of La Crosse.”, pg. Three, Monday, May 22, 1922; La Crosse Tribune and Leader-Press, “The Walrus: “The time has come,” the Walrus said. “To talk of many things. Of shoes and ships and sealing wax. Of cabbages and kings.””, by C.A.W., July 23, 1922; American Art Annual, by Florence Nightingale Levy (editor), Vol. XX, The American Federation of Arts, (1923-24); The Buffalo Express (Morning Edition) online digitized news article, “Independent Salon Canvases Placed On Exhibition”, Friday, April 4, 1924, Page Nine; Literary Digest, “Sandor Landeau”, 86, pg. 27 and 28, August 15, 1925;

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New York Times, “Other Engagements: Landeau-Benedict”, November 15, 1931; Index of Artists: International-Biographical, by Daniel Trowbridge Mallett, Two Volumes: including painters, sculptors, illustrators, engravers and etchers of the past and the present not in the 1935 edition, supplement, (1940); La Crosse Tribune, “Landeau Paintings Treasures in Many La Crosse Homes”, July 20, 1952, p. 9.; East Aurora Advertiser, “Grave of Artist in Local Cemetery Remains Unmarked”, March 30, 1961; Roycroft Collectibles, by Charles F. Hamilton, Tavares, FL, SPS Publications, pg. 85, 1980; Dictionary of American Artists: 19th & 20th Century, by Glenn Opitz, Poughkeepsie, NY, Apollo Book, (1982); Who Was Who in American Art: Artists Active Between 1898-1947, by Peter Hastings Falk (editor), (1985); In the Mainstream: The Art of Alexis Jean Fournier, by Rena Neumann Coen, North Star Press, St. Cloud, MN, pg. 20 & 53 (1985); Mantle Fielding's Dictionary of American Painters, Sculptors & Engravers, by Glenn B. Opitz (editor), Poughkeepsie, NY, Apollo Book, (1986);

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The Wayward Muse: A Historical Survey of Painting in Buffalo, by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Susan Krane, Curator, for the painting “Landscape with Horse and Cart, n.d.”, oil on canvas, 35” x 39.5” (Collection of Jeffrey Thier, Buffalo, NY), pg. 109, and Artist Biographies: pg. 192, (1987); Annual Exhibition Record, 1876-1913, by Peter Hastings Falk, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Sound View Press, (June 1989); The Annual Exhibition Record of the Art Institute of Chicago: 1888-1950, by Peter Hastings Falk (editor), Sound View Press, (1990); Annual Exhibition Record, National Academy of Design: 1901-1950, by Peter Hastings Falk (editor), Madison, Connecticut: Sound View Press, (1990); American Art at the Nineteenth Century Paris Salons, by Lois Marie Fink, Washington, DC, National Museum of American Art Smithsonian Institution, and Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, (1990); Art Across America: Two Centuries of Regional Painting 1710-1920, by Dr. William H. Gerdts, Volume One, New England, New York, Mid-Atlantic, New York, Abbeville Press, (1990);

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Archives of American Art Journal, b&w Photograph circa 1900, 13 x 17cm, identification on verso (handwritten): "Old American Art Club, Montparnasse Paris circa 1900. 1. Barlow, 2. Winter, 3. Wood, 4. Landeau, 5. Tanner, 6. Cucel.", Volume 32, no. 2, p. 9, (1992); American Orientalists, by Gerald M. Ackerman, Vol. 10, ACR Édition Internationale, Courbevoie/Paris, Art Création Réalisation (ACR), Printed in France by Mame, Tours, (1994); Head, Heart and Hand: Elbert Hubbard and the Roycofters, by Marie Via, assistant Curator at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester, NY and Marjorie B. Searl, the Estelle B. Goldman Curator of Education at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester, NY, University of Rochester Press, 1994, pg. 121, and 128-131 and end notes 116-133 on pg. 136; “Subject Index to City of La Crosse, Wisconsin Intensive Survey Report: Architectural and Historical Survey Project by Joan Rausch and Richard Zietlin (1996)”, Landeau, Sandor (artist) 298; Online book, Selected Letters of Hamlin Garland, by Keith Hamlin Garland, Pg. 120, Edited by Keith Newlin and Joseph B. McCullough, Lincoln, University of Nebraska press, 1998;

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Who Was Who in American Art, 1564-1975, by Peter Hastings Falk (Editor-in-chief), 3 Volumes, Sound View Press; Madison, CT, (1999); Images of America: The Roycroft Campus, by Robert Rust and Kitty Turgeon, Published by Arcadia Publishing, pg. 23 (photo: painting portrait of Nancy Hubbard), pg. 62 (photo of library with artwork), May 20, 1999; Robert Reviews, “Byrdcliffe: An American Arts and Crafts Colony”, catalog of the exhibition, 2004, Milwaukee Art Museum, Nancy Green, et al., Cornell University Press, (2004); The Artists Bluebook: 34,000 North American Artists to March 2005, by Lonnie Pierson Dunbier (editor), AskArt.com, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ, (2005); Davenport's Art Reference: The Gold Edition, by Ray Davenport, Ventura, CA, (2005); Dante and the Animal Kingdom, by Richard Thayer Holbrook (author), pg. 204, Kessinger Publishing, LLC, (2006); The Eagle Gazette, lancastereaglegazette.com, OH, online news article, “Whereabouts of ‘Maniac’ painting remains a mystery”, by Michelle George, The Eagle Gazette Staff, June 4, 2009; The Western New York Southtowns Scenic Byway, Volume Two: Resource Inventory, by the Urban Design Project, University At Buffalo, The State University of New York, Section II, Historical Quality, pg. 19, (unknown date), WNYSSB_II_Historical.pdf; and possibly many others not mentioned in this list.

For possible additional information or images from this artist, please visit the AskArt link

(Rewritten & compiled chronologically by Mark Strong of Meibohm Fine Arts, Inc., East Aurora, NY, 06/2009 [updated 09/2011], Sources: Our internal records; AskArt.com with permission, info & prior bio submission from the archives of AskArt; search.ancestry.com, Naturalized Passport Application Record for travel to Norway, Sweden from the American Embassy in Paris, France, Form No. 177, No. 102, June 17, 1907; The Elbert Hubbard Roycroft Museum (the ScheideMantelHouse), with special thanks to Tom Alcamo, Co-curator of the museum and Vice President of the Aurora Historical Society, 363 Oakwood Avenue, East Aurora, NY; A special thank you for biographical information and quote [2] from Scott Sackett, Associate Producer for WNED-TV, Buffalo, NY, for his PBS website documentary on the Roycroft Artisans titled “Elbert Hubbard: An American Original”, and from his information from Bill Petersen, Associate Archives Librarian, La Crosse Public Library, La Crosse, WI; and from numerous other sources too long to list here and are furnished upon request.)
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